Tag Archives: History of Cinema Festival

what makes a movie good?

Before I start talking about individual films, I wanted to say more about my recently concluded History of Cinema Festival. In my last post I raised the question, What do I think makes a movie good? I’m going to try to … Continue reading

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Paul’s History of Cinema Festival: R.I.P.

I now pronounce Paul’s History of Cinema Festival closed. It has been a wonderful trip, involving the viewing (or partial viewing) of 536 films, and has brought some surprises. It began in November 2008, when my wife Kimmie and I … Continue reading

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the walking dead

A couple of weeks ago Kimmie and I watched season 1 of the HBO series The Walking Dead about a zombie apocalypse. The show had been recommended to me; otherwise I would not have tried it, having been so disappointed … Continue reading

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Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice: ridiculous & lovable

Last night’s entry in Paul’s History of Cinema Festival was the 1969 social comedy Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, written by Paul Mazursky and Larry Tucker, and directed by Mazursky. It’s a movie I first saw about 8 … Continue reading

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Rosemary’s Baby: not just any date-rape

Paul’s History of Cinema Festival last night brought us to mid-1968 with Roman Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby, written by Polanski from the novel by Ira Levin. While watching Polanski’s sure-footed interpretation of the story I had a new feeling: after 3 … Continue reading

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The Graduate: the time to act is now

On Sunday night I loaded up the latest entry in Paul’s History of Cinema Festival: The Graduate, written by Calder Willingham and Buck Henry from a novel by Charles Webb and directed by Mike Nichols. I’d seen it once before … Continue reading

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