Tag Archives: Orson Scott Card

tonight’s bout: Paul Clifford vs. Christopher Columbus

All right, I was talking about examining the opening sentences of novels that I read and comparing them with the “zero level” opener to Edward Bulwer-Lytton’s 1830 Paul Clifford, the infamous, “It was a dark and stormy night. . . … Continue reading

Posted in book reviews, thoughts | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

well begun is half done

It was a dark and stormy night; the rain fell in torrents — except at occasional intervals, when it was checked by a violent gust of wind which swept up the streets (for it is in London that our scene … Continue reading

Posted in thoughts, writer's notes | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

creating characters in epic fiction, part 2

Character creation is one of the most difficult and demanding tasks in the art of storytelling. Some people have a talent for it—I think Charles Dickens was one of these—while the rest of us have to stretch out a thinner … Continue reading

Posted in thoughts, writer's notes | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

creating characters in epic fiction, part 1

I’ve been writing for a long time, and I do it professionally, but nonetheless I regard myself as a student of the craft rather than some kind of master of it. So if you’re a writer, or perhaps a deep … Continue reading

Posted in thoughts, writer's notes | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

slow learners

I’m back. Why the long absence since my last post? It’s not easy to explain. I suppose I could say that I’ve been going through a period of slow-burning crisis. What sort of crisis, you ask? It’s a crisis with … Continue reading

Posted in thoughts | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments